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New feature: Calendar Perspective

Recently we published a post about the Chart Perspective and today, we are pleased to announce the  Calendar Perspective!


If your collection contains attributes with date and time, you can view them in a calendar. Don’t worry about the format - Lumeer recognizes lots of formats and doesn’t mind if the value is “01/04/2019” or “April 1, 2019 6pm” (in case your favourite date format is not supported, please let us know and we will make it work).


After switching the perspective, choose attributes that contain your event name and start date. You can also choose an attribute with an end date but this is optional as some types of data (e.g. orders) contain only one date.




Now that there are events displayed in the calendar, you can see their names by hovering over the dots:




And after clicking on the dot, you can see all details of the event and update it:




You can of course add a new event to the calendar without going back to the table or post-it perspective. Double-click on a date and a window for creating a new event appears:




When you return to the Post-it Perspective, the new event is there:




In the top-right corner, there are controls for switching between monthly, weekly and daily view:




Try Lumeer today and see your time data in the matching perspective!

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